The adventures of my D&D roleplays
Reblogged from rpgprotip  6 notes
rpgprotip:

So while I was on my flight back from New Mexico I snagged this picture. Unsure of where it is, but I initially took it because as soon as I saw it, I thought about a fantasy setting (obviously). Really about how places like these would be colonized first - and for good reason. This city has a great water source. That’s really it. But think about how important that is to a place with little to no technology. Maybe they haven’t really got the hang of irrigation, or aqueducts aren’t big in that area or time. Settling your city near an ample water source is going to be very important.
I’ve been thinking about that a lot since making the map to my own little world (or continent, for now). A lot of my towns have little rivers or wells nearby, but there’s really only a couple coastal cities or places built on or near a lake, and only one is really significant. I need to remedy that, I think. Either way, the next map I make will have sufficient water sources or aqueducts nearby. 
So I guess PRO-TIP! When designing towns, cities or whatever, don’t forget about the stuff that allows that town to survive and thrive - lots of water, some food sources (hunting and agriculture), access to trade routes, and maybe even an export that no other nearby towns/cities have access to. 
Your turn! What other things might a town or city have to survive, or bring adventurers to it? 
PS: +2 Perception to anyone who can spot the skull

rpgprotip:

So while I was on my flight back from New Mexico I snagged this picture. Unsure of where it is, but I initially took it because as soon as I saw it, I thought about a fantasy setting (obviously). Really about how places like these would be colonized first - and for good reason. This city has a great water source. That’s really it. But think about how important that is to a place with little to no technology. Maybe they haven’t really got the hang of irrigation, or aqueducts aren’t big in that area or time. Settling your city near an ample water source is going to be very important.

I’ve been thinking about that a lot since making the map to my own little world (or continent, for now). A lot of my towns have little rivers or wells nearby, but there’s really only a couple coastal cities or places built on or near a lake, and only one is really significant. I need to remedy that, I think. Either way, the next map I make will have sufficient water sources or aqueducts nearby. 

So I guess PRO-TIP! When designing towns, cities or whatever, don’t forget about the stuff that allows that town to survive and thrive - lots of water, some food sources (hunting and agriculture), access to trade routes, and maybe even an export that no other nearby towns/cities have access to. 

Your turn! What other things might a town or city have to survive, or bring adventurers to it? 

PS: +2 Perception to anyone who can spot the skull

Reblogged from charlesonmambo  2,512 notes

outofcontextdnd:

GM: You recognize the riders from legend; they seem to be The Four Horsemen.

Bard-barian, in character: Everywhere we go, there’s demons, angels, demigods bossing us around, wanting favors, getting us into trouble, sending us out for groceries. No more. *shouts to the horsemen* NO. GO THE FUCK HOME.